Seawall Committee Meeting – 05/02/2014

Permits have been posted for seawall project...

Permits have been posted for seawall project…

 
UPDATE TO THIS POST Procurment_Schedule_PW14-03R- Kingsbridge_Seawall_Stabalization_Project 5-28-14
 

The Meeting opened with Ray presenting the yellow permit pending to post.

The Coastal commission has given approval – this is the last permit requirement.

 Revised Bid Request

Due to the unexpected cost of the 2 bids received and withdrawn due to last of funding
Cameron Duncan of TranSystems had delivered a document to Ray outlining the options for repackaging the rebidding.

From Cameron:

1. Award the contract to current low bidder.

2. Inform low bidder they have been selected but that the project is over budget and cannot be awarded. Work with them to lower cost. Shoot for a $250K reduction (we will likely not make this target but we want them to think about big ticket items). Request suggestions from them on ideas to reduce cost. Accommodate all of the suggestions which are practical and then award at lower cost. This may save $100-$150K

3. Re-advertise with longer response period, more flexibility on construction window and deletion of laydown area requirement. This may save $100-$200K but there are no guarantees the result will differ from first bid .

.4. Combine with Hemlock repair to increase value and response. -Work is dissimilar so may not be a good match for benefit of efficiencies. Would take approx 6 months to put this design together and get new permit. Estimated savings $100K

5. Combine with 50 pilaster repair contract -minor effort to expand permit. Could be packaged quickly but would take work away from ON-Call Contractor unless he joins the open bidding. May draw more bidders but total savings is expected to be modest($1 OOK savings) due to the modest increase ($250K) of additional work.

6. Combine with first Zurn wall deterioration repair. The wall directly across from the Kingsbridge site is one of the worst in the community. If we add this work, all disruption is kept in the same basin which minimizes community impact, dock moves and permitting. Increases near-term cost $1 Million but long term savings of $300K-$400K expected to not disrupt this basin again for 30 years. Kingsbridge could start one month early and the Jamestown wall deterioration work across the channel would not start right after. Permits and design are estimated to take 5-6 months to add this project.

Cameron

Items 1 and 2 are off the table because the bids were all rejected. However we may want to keep this in mind for the next round of bidding.

Item 3
In the world of magical thinking – we might get lucky if there is a vendor with a small window of downtime between larger projects and they want to keep a crew going. Because it has been expressed that our projects are very small – by allowing an expanded bid period – was 30 days take it to 45. Expand the start time window (allow the project to start within 6 mos after approval with an agreement that it will be completed once begun with no further interruption). Expand the work hours to accommodate tide tables and include Saturdays as optional work days. (IF cost savings are justified by per diem expenses being offset by overtime pay. )
A 100 to 200k reduction is not nearly enough of a cost savings to accommodate even the Kingsbridge project alone if the new bids are anywhere near the last ones.

Item 4 – the discussion ran around a lot on this one but again – COSTS & TIME???

Item 5   SAME – Item 6 SAME

We are window shopping… this is not going anywhere with the level of funding available.

I believe the City is fully aware that at this point we are sawing sawdust but they hope it keeps us busy.

I do think that if we should move forward on the reissue of a request for bids with the revised scope.

We also need to find ways to approach the City of Oxnard for more funds to be approved and to consider longer range plans. In this light I think we need to take a serious look at Camerons initial report and set a timeline of expectations and expand research and awareness of our concerns.